Instruction

Graduation & Promotion

Can be localized — see section G: Localized Policies

Instruction Policy B. 1.0

Policy:  Green Dot High School Graduation Requirements

High School Graduation Requirements

To graduate from high school, Green Dot students must earn a minimum of 240 credits. The recommended graduation requirements are outlined in the table below.

High school graduation requirements may vary by school with approval from the Green Dot Board of Directors.

The A-G requirements are the minimum requirements for admission into the California State University (“CSU”) or University of California (“UC”) system.

 

Graduation Requirements for Students with an IEP, 504 Plan, or ILP 

Eligibility Criteria: 

Students who have an individualized education program (“IEP”) adopted pursuant to the federal Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004, a plan adopted pursuant to Section 504 (“504 Plan”) of the federal Rehabilitation Act of 1973, or an Individual Learning Plan (“ILP”) adopted pursuant to Green Dot policy may be eligible to graduate under the Minimum Green Dot Graduation Requirements option outlined in the table below.  Minimum Graduation Requirements do not satisfy the requirements to apply to the UC system and CSUs.  Green Dot shall provide students eligible for Minimum Graduation Requirements with information and support to post-secondary opportunities.

 

  • Students with an IEP or 504 Plan

A student with an active IEP or 504 Plan is eligible to graduate under the Minimum Graduation Requirements if:

  • the student’s IEP or 504 Plan indicates that the student is scheduled to receive a high school diploma by fulfilling the Green Dot’s Minimum Graduation Requirements; and
  • the student’s IEP or 504 Plan indicates how the student’s disability or suspected disability adversely impacts the student’s progress towards meeting regular graduation requirements.
  • Students with an ILP

A student with an active ILP is eligible to graduate under the Minimum Graduation Requirements if:

  • he or she is designated as an English Learner based on the English Language Proficiency Assessment for California (EPLAC); and
  • at the end of the first semester of the 11th grade year of high school, he or she is determined not able to graduate by the end of the fourth year of high school.;
  • written parental consent is received if the student is under 18 years of age; and
  • the student and his or her parent/guardian abide by the ILP’s terms.
  • Completion Time

The time to complete the Minimum Graduation Requirements must be stated in the student’s IEP, 504 Plan, or ILP.

 

Students who have an active IEP or 504 Plan, and who are eligible to graduate under the Minimum Graduation Requirements must complete state-mandated testing requirements and/or applicable state waivers.

Students in Foster Care, Homeless Students, Migratory Children, Children of a Military Family, and Students Participating in a Newcomer Program

When a student in foster care, a homeless student, a migratory child, a child of a military family, and a student participating in a newcomer program who has completed their second year of high school transfer into Green Dot, they shall be exempted from all Green Dot-adopted coursework and other Green Dot-established graduation requirements (the “Exempted Student”), unless the School makes a finding that the student is reasonably able to complete the additional requirements in time to graduate from high school by the end of their fourth year of high school. Within 30 calendar days of a foster youth’s transfer, the Principal or designee shall notify the foster youth, the person holding the right to make educational decisions for him/her, and the foster youth’s social worker, of the availability of the exemption and whether the foster youth qualifies for it.

To determine whether a student in foster care, a homeless student, a migratory child, a child of a military family, and a student participating in a newcomer program is in their third or fourth year of high school, Green Dot shall use either the number of credits the student has earned as of the date of the transfer or the length of their school enrollment, whichever qualifies him/her for the exemption.

The Principal or designee shall notify any Exempted Student and the person holding the right to make educational decisions for him/her how any requirements that are waived will affect the Exempted Student’s ability to gain admission to a postsecondary educational institution and shall provide information about transfer opportunities available through the California Community Colleges.

Green Dot shall not require or request a student in foster care, a homeless student, a migratory child, a child of a military family, and a student participating in a newcomer program to transfer schools in order to qualify for an exemption and no request for a transfer solely to qualify for an exemption shall be made by a student in foster care, a homeless student, a migratory child, a child of a military family, and a student participating in a newcomer program or any person acting on behalf of such student.

An Exempted Student may be eligible to graduate under the Minimum Graduation Requirements per California Education Code Section 51225.1 et seq.  For the purposes of this Instruction Policy Section B. 1.0, the following definitions apply:

  • “A student in foster care” is defined in Section A. 6.1 in this Student Policy Manual.
  • “A homeless student” is defined in Section A. 6.0 in this Student Policy Manual.
  • “A migratory child” is a student who meets the definition of “currently migratory child” under California Education Code Section 54441:
    • A child who has moved with a parent, guardian, or other person having custody, from one school district to another, either within the State of California or from another state within the 12-month period immediately preceding his or her identification as such a child, in order that the child, a parent, guardian, or other member of his or her immediate family might secure temporary or seasonal employment in an agricultural or fishing activity, and whose parents or guardians have been informed of the child’s eligibility for migrant education services.
    • “Currently migratory child” includes a child who, without the parent or guardian, has continued to migrate annually to secure temporary or seasonal employment in an agricultural or fishing activity.
  • “A child of a military family” is a student who meets the definition stated in California Education Code Section 49701: a school-aged child enrolled in kindergarten through 12th grade in the household of an active-duty member.
  • “A student participating in a newcomer program” is a student who meets the definition stated in California Education Code Section 51225.2(a): a student who is participating in a program designed to meet the academic and transitional needs of newly arrived immigrant pupils that has as a primary objective the development of English language proficiency.

Upon making a finding that a student in foster care, a homeless student, a migratory child, a child of a military family, and a student participating in a newcomer program is reasonably able to complete Green Dot graduation requirements within their fifth year of high school, the Principal or designee shall:

  1. Inform the Exempted Student and the person holding the right to make educational decisions for him/her of the Exempted Student’s option to remain in school for a fifth year to complete the School’s graduation requirements and how that will affect their ability to gain admission to a postsecondary educational institution
  2. Provide information to the Exempted Student about transfer opportunities available through the California Community Colleges
  3. Upon agreement with the Exempted Student or, if they are under 18 years of age, the person holding the right to make educational decisions for him/her, permit the Exempted Student to stay in school for a fifth year to complete Green Dot’s graduation requirements.

Students Completing Graduation Requirements while being Detained

If a student completes the graduation requirements while being detained (e.g., at a juvenile court school), Green Dot shall issue to the student a diploma from the school the student last attended before detention or, in the alternative, the county superintendent of schools may issue the diploma.

 

Graduation Requirements Table at a Glance

* The UC and CSU allow what is known as validation to meet the requirements for math and Language other than English: refer to https://admission.universityofcalifornia.edu/counselors/files/quick-reference.pdf pages 18-20  The mathematics requirement may be satisfied via meeting UC/CSU validation rules however, students are required to recover any missing credits to meet the total credits required for high school graduation.”

** Physical Education Waivers may be granted for students from participating in a physical education course under special circumstances outlined in the PE Waiver Guideline.

***10 elective credit waivers may be granted for students under special circumstances by submitting a 10-credit waiver form to Principal.

Minimum Semester Credits necessary to graduate and to be promoted to next grade level:

Graduation: 240 semester credits

From 9th to 10th:  60 semester credits

From 10th to 11th:  120 semester credits

From 11th to 12th:  180 semester credits

Cal Grant Program for College

A Cal Grant is money for college that does not have to be paid back. To qualify, a student must meet the eligibility and financial requirements as well as any minimum grade point average (GPA) requirements. Cal Grants can be used at any University of California, California State University, California Community College, or other qualified private and independent career colleges or technical schools.

In order to assist students to apply for financial aid, all grade 12 students are automatically considered a Cal Grant applicant and each grade 12 student’s GPA will be submitted to the California Student Aid Commission (“CASC”) electronically by a school or school district official. A student, or the parent/guardian of a student under 18 years of age, may complete a form to indicate that they do not wish for the school to electronically send CASC the student’s GPA. Until a student turns 18 years of age, only the parent/guardian may opt out the student. Once a student turns 18 years of age, only the student may opt himself/herself out, and can opt in if the

parent/guardian had previously decided to opt out the student. All grade 12 students’ GPA will be

sent to CASC by October 1st. Students must complete a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) or a California Dream Act Application (CDAA) by March 2nd to be considered for Cal Grant eligibility.

 

Rev. 06/2021

Instruction Policy B. 2.0

 Policy:  Distinguished High School Graduate Requirements

 Green Dot Public Schools Distinguished Graduates will achieve the following:

  • 20 hours of community service.
  • Complete the recommended A-G requirements.
    • 30 semester units of Social Studies
    • 40 semester units of English
    • 40 semester units of Mathematics
    • 30 semester units of Lab Science
    • 30 semester units of Language other than English
    • 10 semester units of Visual and Performing Arts
    • 10 semester units of College Prep Elective
  • Completion of 1 UC/CSU transferrable course with a “C” or above grade or passing grade (3 or above) on at least 1 AP Exam prior to graduation.
  • 3.0 or above weighted GPA

 

Rev. 06/2021

Can be localized – see Section G: Localized Policies

Instruction Policy B. 3.0

Policy:  High School Diploma and Commencement Ceremony

Earning a Diploma

A student can only earn a diploma from a Green Dot school once he or she has completed all graduation requirements with regard to classes and credits.

Any student who has not met all credit requirements by the date of graduation must complete all units by the summer of his/her graduation year in order to earn a diploma from a Green Dot school.  Otherwise, the student must either earn the diploma the following year or take alternate routes to receiving a diploma from a non-Green Dot school.

Green Dot may confer an honorary high school diploma upon a student who is terminally ill, so long as the diploma is clearly distinguishable from Green Dot’s regular diploma of graduation.

Green Dot may grant a high school diploma retroactively to a person who:

  1. has departed California against his or her will; and
  2. at the time of his or her departure, was enrolled in grade 12; and
  3. did not receive a high school diploma because his or her education was interrupted due to his or her departure; and
  4. was in good academic standing at the time of his or her departure (considering any coursework that may have been completed by the student outside the United States or that may have been completed by the student through online or virtual courses).

For purposes of this policy, “departed California against his or her will” means the person was:

  1. in custody of a government agency and was transferred to another state; or
  2. subject to a lawful order from a court or government agency that authorized the person’s removal from California; or
  3. subject to a lawful order pursuant to subparagraph (b) above and was permitted to depart California before being removed from California pursuant to the lawful order; or
  4. removed or is permitted to depart voluntarily pursuant to the federal Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. § 1229c).

Commencement Ceremony Participation Requirements

A student may participate in his/her school’s commencement ceremony if one of the following is true:

  1. the student has met all of the school’s graduation requirements with regards to classes and credits, and met all of the school’s commencement ceremony requirements (see below);
  2. the student is deficient 10 or less credits, has met all of the school’s commencement ceremony requirements (see below), and has signed up to make up the credits the summer immediately following graduation; and/or

In addition, each Green Dot school may require its students to complete any or all of the following to be eligible to participate in the school’s commencement ceremony (all of which are not required for UC or CSU admission, and do not require students/parents/guardians to incur any fees):

  1. a senior project/portfolio; and/or
  2. community service hours (Green Dot recommends ten hours per school year).

A student may be prohibited from participating in the commencement ceremony for academic, behavioral, or other reasons at the school Principal’s discretion and with the appropriate Area Superintendent’s approval.

Students may wear traditional tribal regalia or recognized objects of religious or cultural significance as an adornment at the commencement ceremony, unless likely to cause a substantial disruption of, or material interference with, the ceremony, as determined by Green Dot.  For purposes of this policy: “adornment” means something attached to, or worn with, but not replacing, the cap and gown customarily worn at school graduation ceremonies; and “cultural” means recognized practices and traditions of a certain group of people.

 

Rev. 06/2019

Can be localized – see Section G: Localized Policies

Instruction Policy B. 4.0

  • Policy:  Middle School Promotion, Acceleration & Commencement Ceremony

These policies help ensure that each Green Dot student progresses through grade levels after attaining adequate achievement in his/her present grade level (i.e., without social promotion) to prepare for success in high school, college, leadership and life.

Middle School Promotion

To be considered for promotion to the next grade level, each middle school student (grades 6 – 8) must obtain sufficient academic credit in required courses during that school year in accord with Green Dot’s grading scale (see Green Dot Policy B. 5.0, “Grading Scale and Failed Courses”).  Middle school students are required to receive academic instruction and participate in the subject areas of English, Reading, Mathematics, Social Science, and History.

Any student who misses a certain number of days in a semester in a class period may not earn credit in that course (see Green Dot Policy C. 1.0, “Attendance, Absenteeism, Truancy and SART”). Students who fail more than two courses per school year (or fail to obtain 20.0 credits) may not be promoted to the next grade level (i.e., that student may be retained in the same grade level for the following school year).  Students who fail one or two courses in a school year may be required to pass summer school to be promoted to the next grade level.

Green Dot administration reserves the right to review special circumstances and allow consideration to be given.

Acceleration

When high academic achievement is evident, the Chief Academic Officer or designee may recommend a student for acceleration into a higher grade level.  The student’s maturity level shall be taken into consideration.

Middle School Commencement Ceremony Participation Recommendations

Each Green Dot middle school may require its students to complete any or all of the following to be eligible to participate in the school’s commencement ceremony:

  1. community service hours (Green Dot recommends ten hours per school year);
  2. adherence to all disciplinary contracts/agreements.

A student may be prohibited from participating in the commencement ceremony for academic, behavioral, or other reasons at the school Principal’s discretion and with the appropriate Area Superintendent’s approval.

Students may wear traditional tribal regalia or recognized objects of religious or cultural significance as an adornment at the commencement ceremony, unless likely to cause a substantial disruption of, or material interference with, the ceremony, as determined by Green Dot.  For purposes of this policy: “adornment” means something attached to, or worn with, but not replacing, the cap and gown customarily worn at school graduation ceremonies; and “cultural” means recognized practices and traditions of a certain group of people.

Rev. 06/2019

Grades & Records

Can be localized – see Section G: Localized Policies

Instruction Policy  B. 5.0

Policy:  Grading and Failed Courses

Green Dot Public Schools California (GDPSC) believes that best grading practices, supported by current research, consistent across grade levels, content areas and schools, will support our students in achieving equitable academic outcomes. Our grading policy is built to provide students and families with clear and meaningful feedback on the degree to which students have mastered academic skills and learning targets using a common language. Green Dot believes that teachers are best positioned to evaluate student mastery of the content, skills and knowledge of a course.

I. Grading Scale and Criteria 

A. The following four-point scale shall be used for grading all student work and determining course grades.

  1. Teachers have discretion when converting student performance on assessments to scores, but they are encouraged to create rubrics for assignment types in order to provide clarity and transparency around expectations for work to align to the descriptors in the table below. The Quality of Work column is meant to guide teachers in scoring student work. The Student Performance column is meant to help students understand their progress toward mastery of the content.

II. Assignment Types, Category Weights, and Grade Calculation Options

A. All student work shall fall into one of two categories: Assessment and Classwork & Practice. See the table below for details on weighting and assignment types.

B. PowerSchool grade books will be pre-set and must retain the following category weights:

  • Assessment: (80%)
  • Classwork and Practice (20%)
  • Grades in classes will be calculated in PowerSchool using Category Weights (not Total Points).
  • Advisory: teachers will enter grades into Classwork and Practice only. Powerschool will calculate the entire grade based on this category automatically.

Benchmark Assessments:

  • Some benchmarks assess content and skills at the end of a unit of instruction or quarter. These should be counted in the assessment category.
  • Some benchmarks are diagnostic of overall progress toward state or external tests (IAB’s for example) and should not be counted in the assessment category.

 

Grade Calculation Options: Average or Most Recent Grading

Schools and departments will have the option of utilizing one of two methods of calculating final grades for a course.

  • Average Grading

For SY 2021-22, Powerschool will support automatically averaging assignment grades within the two categories.

  • Most Recent Grading (Standards Based)

In order to minimize any bias related to students’ unfinished learning at the start of a course, a school or department may elect to deactivate assignments that do not represent a student’s most recent progress toward mastery of the standards, skills, or concepts assessed. PowerSchool will then automatically create a category grade based on the average of most recent assessments representing the standards assessed in that semester.

 

Assignment Weighting

Assignment Weighting is a Powerschool function that may be utilized in either Average Grading or Most Recent Grading.  In Average Grading, a teacher may wish to ensure that later, more comprehensive assessments are more impactful toward the final grade than earlier formative assessments. In Most Recent Grading, a teacher may wish to ensure that an assessment of a focus standard is more impactful than a standard of less importance.

GDPSC strongly recommends that teachers include the standard in the title of an assignment in PowerSchool (e.g., Introduction Paragraph-W.6.1.a  or Ratios Quiz 7.RP.A.2).

Teachers may create multiple assignments in PS to break up assessments that focus on multiple standards.

 

Emphasis on Mastery vs Behaviors

It is not mandatory to enter grades in the Classwork and Practice category. Work habits like participation and work completion are behaviors, not evidence of learning.  GDPSC encourages departments and teachers to move away from grading participation.

 

Assignment Weighting 

  1. Traditional Averaging:
    1. A teacher may elect to weigh an assessment using the multiplier function in Powerschool. This is an option when an assignment represents a more comprehensive assessment of a standard or set of standards. No assessment will be assigned a multiplier greater than 3.
  1. Standards Based with Most Recent
    1. A teacher may elect to weigh different standards in relation to their relative emphasis in the course by using the multiplier function in Powerschool. GDPSC will provide resources by content to support teachers in determining appropriate weighting. No standard will be assigned a multiplier greater than 1.5.

In both of these scenarios, teachers should consult with colleagues in their department and with administrators overseeing the department to ensure consistency across classes.

 

III. Final Grades 

A. All classes including Advisory will be graded. Students will earn a letter grade. Semester letter grades will be determined using the following scale.

Grade Level of Mastery Points
A Mastery of Standards 3.25-4.0
B Approaching Mastery of Standards 2.25-3.24
C Developing Understanding of Standards 1.75-2.24
D Not Yet Meeting Standards 0.5-1.74
F Insufficient Evidence 0 to 0.49

 

IV. Frequency of Assignments and Communication

A. Green Dot has made a commitment to students and families to be proactive and transparent about grading. Teachers should assign student work daily and enter at least one grade per week in the Assessment category.  As noted above, using the Classwork/Homework category is optional. If it is used, there should be at least 10 assignments so that no assignment is worth more than 2% of a student’s grade.

B. Unit Assessments will be given in most classes at the end of every unit of instruction.

C. Final Assessments: Comprehensive Final Assessments may be administered at the end of each semester. The form of a final assessment may be an exam, essay, portfolio, or project and should be counted in the assessment category. A comprehensive final assessment should be graded prior to grades being due for the semester. In a standards-based grade book, multiple grades may be assigned to reflect achievement for the different standards assessed by the exam.

D. Student grades shall be updated in time for the following progress reports and report cards to be sent or emailed home.

E. At least one Advisory grade should be entered per week.

 

V. Late Work and Grade Improvement

A. Students will have the opportunity to turn-in late work or missing assignments as well as the opportunity to correct or redo an assignment for a Mastery or Approaching Mastery of Standard grade at least until the unit assessment.

B. Teachers will provide multiple opportunities to demonstrate mastery of a standard, skill, or concept throughout a unit. Options for teachers include: item corrections, re-take of the same assessment or a similar assessment with unique questions. Students may be required to participate in a reteach or office hours session prior to accessing the next opportunity to demonstrate mastery. Teachers should provide some support prior to the retake to ensure student success. At the end of a unit, a student shall have an additional opportunity to improve assessment scores by re-taking or correcting portions of the same assessment or similar assessment items within one week, as long as the end of the semester does not prevent such a re-take (for example, final assessments).

C. If a student retakes/corrects an assessment and earns a higher grade, the new score will replace the old score.

D. Credit Recovery and Extended Semester: When students enrolled in a credit recovery course (e.g., APEX, Acellus) pass any of the courses they are taking during credit recovery, this passing grade will be reflected on their transcript.

 

VI. Academic Dishonesty

In the Student Policy Manual, Section C 3.0 academic dishonesty in a course will be addressed through progressive discipline based on the seriousness of the offense.  Appropriate interventions and/or consequences may be assigned, including a parent conference or Discipline Review Board meeting to address such infractions.

 

VII. Accommodations and Modifications 

A. All students with disabilities receiving special education services through an Individual Education Program (“IEP”) will be able to access the accommodations and modifications  included in their IEP to the fullest extent possible.

Some students with IEPs may have accommodations or modifications to grading listed in their IEPs. These types of accommodations and modifications would supersede the grading policy. Teachers should refer to each student’s IEP for specific information. Any questions about the implementation of accommodations or modifications should be directed to school administration immediately.

Some students have accommodations or modifications for assessments in their IEPs.  Assessments that have limited accommodation (see Section K of the IEP, not Page 1) such as IABs should not be entered into the gradebook (see Benchmark Assessments above).

B. All students receiving accommodations and supports through a 504 Plan will be able to access their accommodations to the fullest extent possible. General Ed. Teachers will be working with 504 designees to ensure that accommodations are fairly provided and accessed.

 

VIII. Distance Learning

A. In the event that public health conditions necessitate a return to distance learning, hybrid learning, or other adjustments to the instructional delivery model, GDPSC may make mid-year adjustments to this grading policy.  Such adjustments shall be distributed to students, families, and staff with ample notice and opportunity for clarification of understanding.

The grade of “I” (Incomplete) may only be given when extended illness, other unusual circumstances, or an eligible student’s participation in the school’s Extended Semester Program warrant giving the student additional time to fulfill the course work. These grades must be removed within eight weeks of the next semester, or they become an “F”.

Failed Courses

It is each student’s responsibility to achieve academic success. If a student is experiencing difficulty with a course, they should seek assistance and support from their teacher, counselor or advisor.  In the event that a student fails a course required for graduation, they are required to retake and pass the course before a diploma will be issued.

 

Rev. 06/2021

Instruction Policy                                                                                                                                             B. 6.0

Policy:  Academic Honors

Green Dot Public Schools will recognize students who have attained outstanding scholastic achievement each year based on the criteria listed below.

3.0 – 3.49 GPA Honor Roll

3.5 – 3.99 GPA High Honors

4.0 And above 4.0 Club

The Valedictorian(s) and Salutatorian(s) of each graduating class will be determined by the highest grade point average (weighted) and the second highest grade point average (weighted). All students will be considered for these honors including transfer students.

Rev. 05/2015

Instruction Policy B. 7.0

Policy:  Grade Changes and Withdrawal Grades

Requests for Grade Changes

A student or parent/guardian may request a grade change.  Such requests shall be addressed with the teacher.  The teacher shall respond and provide a decision regarding the requested grade change without unreasonable delay.  The teacher’s decision shall be final absent clerical or mechanical error, fraud, bad faith, or incompetency.  Disagreement with the teacher’s grading philosophy or criteria are not bases for changing a grade.  If the student or parent/guardian desire to appeal the teacher’s decision, the following procedures shall be followed:

  • A written request shall be directed to the Principal or designee within ten school days from the start of the new quarter/semester regarding a grade from the immediately preceding quarter/semester. The Principal or designee shall consult with the teacher and student, and provide a written response within ten school days.  The burden of proving any alleged clerical or mechanical error, fraud, bad faith, or incompetency is upon the student or parent/guardian.
  • If further appeal is desired, a written request shall be directed to the school’s Area Superintendent within 15 school days. The Area Superintendent shall give the teacher an opportunity to address concerns raised by the student or parent/guardian within the scope of the grade change request.  The Area Superintendent shall provide a written response within ten school days of receipt of the appeal.
  • If further appeal is desired, a written request shall be directed to Green Dot’s Chief Academic
    Officer (“CAO”) within 15 school days. The CAO shall allow the teacher an opportunity to address concerns raised by the student or parent/guardian within the scope of the grade change request.
  • The student or parent/guardian may place a written rebuttal to the last appellate decision reached in the process in the student’s file.

Withdrawal Grades

Green Dot does not grant credit for courses if the student transfers out of any Green Dot school prior to the end of a semester, subject to the exceptions below.  The current grades in PowerSchool will be assigned as progress grades for work completed at the time of the transfer. The receiving school is responsible for granting credit.

Exceptions to Withdrawal Grades

If the student is transferring out of a Green Dot school 20 school days or less prior to the end of a semester, the student will be responsible for all course requirements and must take the final exam to receive credit.  A student will be granted an “I” (Incomplete) until all course requirements are completed. If the student does not complete the course requirements, including any final exam, they automatically receive an “F” (Fail) in those course requirements, therefore potentially resulting in a lower grade.  The grade of an “I” must be removed within six weeks of the grade being issued or it shall become an “F”.

Foster, homeless, probation, migrant, and newcomer youth shall receive full or partial credits based on seat-time for all work satisfactorily completed before transferring out of a Green Dot school.  Upon receiving notification from a receiving school that a foster youth has transferred, Green Dot will issue check-out grades based upon the current grade assigned in PowerSchool, and award full or partial credits on an official transcript and send to the receiving school.

Grade Changes by Teachers

A teacher that desires to change a student grade after initial submission to the school must submit Green Dot’s “Request for Grade Change” form to a school counselor and administrator.  This form, once complete with signatures from the Principal and student’s counselor, shall be placed and maintained in student’s cumulative file.

 

Rev. 06/2021

Instruction Policy  B. 8.0

Policy:  Transcripts

Credit

All Green Dot course credits are based on the California Department of Education recommendation for credit hours.

Granting Credit for Green Dot Courses:

Courses worth five credits

  • All courses are worth 5 credits unless otherwise noted in the Green Dot Course Catalog
  • A total of 5 credits are awarded in a subject when the course is successfully completed with a letter grade of D or higher*
  • Green Dot does not offer credit for letter grades of F

The UC system does not acknowledge a letter grade of a D in the admissions process

* Select Green Dot schools do not offer credit for the letter grade of a D

Courses worth less than five Green Dot credits

  • Pass/Fail or No Credit bases are not factored into a student GPA
  • CSU/UC transferrable college courses worth 3 units and 5 units are equivalent to year- long courses taken in high school, and will be given a high school value of 10 credits when students earn a grade of a ‘C’ or better
  • Transferrable courses not from a CSU/UC worth 3 units and 5 units are equivalent to semester-long courses taken in high school, and will be given a high school value of 5 credits when students earn a grade of a ‘C’ or better
    • College courses, including CSU/UC transferrable courses, with a value of 2 units will be given a high school value of 5 credits when students earn a grade of a ‘C’ or better
    • CSU/UC transferrable college courses with a value of 1 unit will be given a high school value of 5 credits when students earn a grade of “C” or better
    • All other college courses with a value of 1 unit will be given a value of 2.5 high school credits when students earn a grade of “C” or better
    • Credits may be given to additional college programs with approval from the Green Dot Chief Academic Officer

It is not mandatory to add college courses to the student’s transcript. If a student and parent/guardian seek to add a course to the high school transcript for concurrent or dual-enrollment courses, a student must make a request to their school Counselor by January 31st of their 12th grade year.  A student’s school Counselor should inform the student of potential implications of adding the course. Potential implications include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • A student’s GPA may change (either increase or decrease) depending on the grade earned in the class and their historical grades.
  • A student’s class rank may change.
  • Certain colleges may only recognize the course(s) as a high school course(s).

Attendance requirement for credit:  Students with 15 or more days of absence in a semester may not receive a passing grade and/or credit for the course.

Effect of Absences on Grades for Foster Youth

The grades of a student in foster care shall not be lowered for any absence from school that is due to either of the following circumstances:

  1. A decision by a court or placement agency to change the student’s placement, in which case the student’s grades shall be calculated as of the date they left school.
  2. A verified court appearance or related court-ordered activity.

Advanced Placement and Honors Courses

GDPS will offer a wide range of courses including Honors and Advanced Placement.

Students who pass the Advanced Placement course with a C or higher will receive an additional point for the course for their GPA.

Students who pass an Honors course with a C or higher will receive an additional point for their GPA.  Honors courses approved for the 11th and 12th grades on the school A-G course list will receive an additional point for the CSU and UC college applications.

Physical Education Credit for Student Athletes

Students who are engaged in a regular school-sponsored interscholastic athletic program carried on wholly or partially after school hours may earn one semester of Physical Education Course credit.  The athletic program must account for a minimum of 60 hours of physical activity per semester.  Program records must be maintained by the athletic director or coach and submitted to principal or designee in order to allow student engaged in the athletic program to earn one semester of Physical Education Credit.  Students can earn a maximum of one semester of Physical Education Credit per semester.  Students must complete the Physical Education waiver in order to qualify for this exemption.

Physical Education Waivers

Physical Education Waivers may be granted for students from participating in a physical education course under special circumstances. The waiver may be granted to individual students who meet the following criteria:

– Students 16 years of age or older and has not had the opportunity to take any Physical Education classes due to being enrolled in special academic programs such as Marching Band, or JROTC.

– Students who are enrolled in a juvenile home, ranch, camp, or forestry camp school where pupils are scheduled for recreation and exercise. This pertains to the time the student is enrolled in these programs.

-Students who are on a minimum graduation requirement program and will not have the opportunity to take the second year of physical education requirement.

-Students who are ill or injured and may have received home and hospital education services and will not have the opportunity to take physical education courses prior to graduation.

Granting Credit from Non-Green Dot schools:

The Principal or designee will evaluate transcripts and credit accordingly. The following have been provided as guidelines:

Transfer of Credit from External Schools

Green Dot will transfer any credits received at another high school when an official transcript is provided and classes meet both of the following guidelines:

  • UC/CSU approved
  • Counselor/Principal verification

When transferring credits from a school using a different credit system, Green Dot will evaluate the course and transfer the courses and credits into the appropriate format. (i.e., quarter to semester, trimester to semester).

Students entering a Green Dot school more than 3 weeks into the grading period of a semester must make-up all missed work for each class in order to earn a semester grade or have progress grades that are a C or higher in each course that will be averaged with the remaining class assignments.

Transferring Credit for Summer Classes

Students can earn credit for summer classes for remediation and enrichment.  Students cannot take summer courses for original credit to replace Green Dot graduation requirements (i.e., English 10 cannot be taken during the summer to avoid taking English 10 in the sophomore year.)

Students will receive credit for summer classes only when official transcripts have been provided to the school Counselor.  Summer transcripts must be received by the end of the first semester.

Transferring Community College Courses and Credits

Community college courses must be taken under concurrent enrollment, or dual enrollment, to be transferable for dual credit. Non-remedial academic courses taken at a community college can be credited as dual college and high school credit.

Transfer of Coursework and Credits for Students in Foster Care, Homeless Students, Migratory Children, Children of a Military Family, Students Participating in a Newcomer Program, and Student in Juvenile Court School* When a student in foster care, a homeless student, a migratory child, a child of a military family, a student participating in a newcomer program, or a student in juvenile court school transfers into Green Dot, the School shall accept and issue full credit for any coursework that the student in foster care, a homeless student, a migratory child, a child of a military family, a student participating in a newcomer program, or a student in juvenile court school has satisfactorily completed while attending another public school, a juvenile court school, or a nonpublic, nonsectarian school or agency and shall not require the student in foster care, a homeless student, a migratory child, a child of a military family, a student participating in a newcomer program, or a student in juvenile court school  to retake the course.

If the student in foster care, a homeless student, a migratory child, a child of a military family, a student participating in a newcomer program, or a student in juvenile court school did not complete the entire course, they shall be issued partial credit for the coursework completed and shall not be required to retake the portion of the course that they completed at their  previous school. However, Green Dot may require the student in foster care, a homeless student, a migratory child, a child of a military family, a student participating in a newcomer program, or a student in juvenile court school to retake the portion of the course completed if, in consultation with the holder of educational rights for the student in foster care, a homeless student, a migratory child, a child of a military family, a student participating in a newcomer program, or a student in juvenile court school, Green Dot finds that the student in foster care, a homeless student, a migratory child, a child of a military family, a student participating in a newcomer program, or a student in juvenile court school is reasonably able to complete the requirements in time to graduate from high school. Whenever partial credit is issued to a student in foster care, a homeless student, a migratory child, a child of a military family, a student participating in a newcomer program, or a student in juvenile court school in any particular course, they shall be enrolled in the same or equivalent course, if applicable, so that they may continue and complete the entire course.

In no event shall Green Dot prevent a student in foster care, a homeless student, a migratory child, a child of a military family, a student participating in a newcomer program, or a student in juvenile court school from taking or retaking a course to meet the eligibility requirements for admission to the California State University or the University of California.

Home-Schooled Students, Non-Accredited High Schools or International Schools

Students enrolling from home schools or non-accredited high schools will be required to provide official transcripts from the previous schools.  Students must pass a proficiency test for the courses for which they desire to receive equivalency credit. Equivalency credit will be granted upon determination of mastered skills.  At times, proficiency may be indicated by the successful completion of the next sequenced course if approval is secured from the Green Dot Chief Academic Officer.

Charges for Duplication of, or Locating/Retrieving, Records

To provide copies of any student record, Green Dot may charge a reasonable fee not to exceed the actual cost of providing the copies.  No charge shall be made for providing up to two transcripts or up to two verifications of various records for any former student.  No charge shall be made to locate or retrieve any student record.

 

Rev. 06/2021

Instruction Policy B. 9.0

Policy:  Release of Student Records to Other Schools, including Colleges

Upon request from other K-12 schools, colleges or universities for information pertaining to an applying student’s record, including disciplinary record, Green Dot administrators and counselors must honestly and fully disclose the education records, including information regarding events resulting in suspension or expulsion, so long as the disclosure is for purposes related to the student’s enrollment or transfer in the K – 12 school, college, or university. Green Dot administrators and counselors will make a reasonable attempt to notify the parent or student, if he/she is over 18, of the request for records at his/her last known address, unless the disclosure is initiated by the parent or student over age 18.  Additionally, Green Dot will give the parent or student over age 18, upon request, a copy of the record that was disclosed and give the parent or student over age 18, upon request, an opportunity for hearing pursuant to the School’s pupil record challenge procedures. The administrator and/or counselor will also encourage students to respond honestly and timely to such requests on their own.

Rev. 06/2017

Academic Program

Instruction Policy 10.0

Policy:  Special Needs

Equal Education Opportunities

At Green Dot Public Schools all students shall be afforded the right and opportunity to an equal education.  No student shall be excluded, segregated or discriminated against in the Green Dot Public School environment for reasons of race, ethnicity, color, national origin, gender, economic status, sexual orientation, actual or perceived mental or physical disability, religion, or religious affiliation.

▪   Section 504 Plan

Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 states that no otherwise qualified handicapped individual in the United States…shall, solely by reason of his handicap, be excluded from the participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity receiving federal financial assistance. (29 USC 794)

  • Compliance monitored by the Office of Civil Rights.
  • Applies to all institutions receiving federal financial assistance, such as public schools.
  • Schools are obligated to provide a “free appropriate public education” (FAPE) to children with a disability.

Section 504 prohibits discrimination while assuring that disabled students have educational opportunities and benefits equal to those provided to non-disabled students. If you would like to know more about 504 Plans or other types of assistance available to your student, please contact your Principal.

▪   Special Education

Green Dot schools are dedicated to the belief that all students can learn and must be guaranteed equal opportunity to become contributing members of the academic environment and society.  Green Dot provides special education instruction and related services in accordance with the IDEA, Education Code requirements, and applicable policies and procedures of the authorizing county, school district, and/or applicable special education local plan area.  These services are available for special educations students enrolled at Green Dot.  Green Dot offers high quality educational programs and services for all our students in accordance with the assessed needs of each student.  Green Dot collaborates with parents, the student, teachers, and other agencies, as may be indicated, in order to appropriately serve the educational needs of each student.  Students and parents/guardians have the complaint rights afforded to them under state and federal law, including the right to file a due process complaint.

Referrals for determination for eligibility for special education and services may come from teachers, parents, agencies, appropriate professional persons, and from other members of the public. Special Education referrals will be coordinated with school site procedures for referral of students with needs that cannot be met with modifications of the regular instructional program, including referrals from student intervention teams, such as the Student Study Team (SST). A student shall be referred for special education and services after the resources of the regular education program have been considered and, where appropriate, utilized.

o   Student Study Team (SST)

The Student Study Team is an efficient and effective way to bring together all resources, human and programmatic, to support students having difficulties in regular classes.  This is a concentrated solution-seeking meeting where all the needed persons, including the student and parent, are present at the same time.  The SST is an expression of the school’s concern for students and provides a supportive atmosphere for students to become actively involved in determining their own needs and in implementing strategies designed to help them.

The goals of the SST are to:

  • Work with the student and parent to identify causes of poor academic performance, disruptive behavior, and potential developmental problems
  • Work with the student and parent to identify viable interventions that could occur before a student’s poor academic performance results in severe underperformance or behavior results in a referral to the Think Tank
  • Discuss a variety of academic interventions and/or positive behavioral reinforcements and develop strategies that have a high likelihood of positive academic and behavior performance
  • Inform parent and student of the referral process, where the student is in the process and the consequences of further poor academic performance and/or disruptive behavior
  • Student study teams are also established to fulfill requirements of current federal and state legislation.

 

Rev. 06/2021

Instruction Policy B. 11.0

Policy:  Required Testing

Green Dot schools shall annually administer required state testing to the applicable grades (e.g., the California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress.)  Notwithstanding any other provision of law, a parent’s or guardian’s written request to Green Dot officials to excuse his or her child from any or all parts of the state assessments shall be granted.  Please see below for more information regarding the various types of state tests.

California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress

The California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress (“CAASPP”) is comprised of the following:

  • Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium (“SBAC”) summative assessment for English–Language Arts (“ELA”) and Mathematics in grades 3-8 and 11.
  • California Science Test in grades 5, 8, and 11.
  • California Alternate Assessments (“CAA”) for ELA and Mathematics in grades 3-8 and 11 and the field test in Science in grades 5, 8, and 11.
  • Optional for local educational agencies to administer, the Standards-based Tests in Spanish. (Further information about grade levels and subjects will be forthcoming.)

California Alternate Assessments

As noted above, the CAAs for ELA and Mathematics are given in grades 3-8 and 11. The CAA for Science is given in grades 5 and 8 and one time in high school. Only eligible students may participate in the administration of the CAAs.

California Science Test

California Science Test (“CAST”) will be first operational in spring 2019.  Students will be administered the CAST in grades 5 and 8 and once in high school. The CAST is aligned with the California Next Generation Science Standards.

Smarter Balanced Assessments Consortium

The Smarter Balanced assessment consortium utilizes computer-adaptive tests and performance tasks that allow students to show what they know and are able to do. This system is based on the Common Core State Standards for ELA and Mathematics.

Physical Fitness Test

State Law requires schools to administer the Physical Fitness Test (“PFT”) annually to all students in grade nine. The state-designated PFT is the FITNESSGRAM@, developed by the Cooper Institute for Aerobics Research. The FITNESSGRAM@ is a set of tests designed to evaluate health-related fitness and to assist students in establishing lifetime habits of regular physical activity.

The complete FITNESSGRAM test battery measures student performance in the following areas:

  1. Aerobic capacity
  2. Body composition
  3. Muscular strength, endurance and flexibility

Additional tests for some students:

Spanish Standards Test (STS)

The Spanish Standards Test is a Spanish-language test administered to Spanish speaking students in grades 2–11 who have been enrolled in California schools for less than one year.

English Language Proficiency Assessments for California (“ELPAC”)The ELPAC is only given to students whose primary language is not English.  The ELPAC is given as an initial assessment to newly enrolled students whose primary language is not English and as an annual assessment for all English Learners.  It is comprised of two separate assessments: one for the initial identification of students as English learners (ELs), and a second for the annual summative assessment to measure a student’s progress in learning English and to identify the student’s level of English language proficiency.

Rev. 06/2019

Instruction Policy B. 12.0

Policy:  English Language Development (ELD) Program:

1.       Assessment

2.       Reclassification

3.       Monitoring

4.       Notifications

5.       Waivers

EL Assessment

State and federal laws require that all students whose primary language is other than English be assessed for English language proficiency.  The English Language Proficiency Assessment for California (ELPAC) is California’s test of English language proficiency.  It is administered each year as an initial assessment (IA) to newly enrolled students whose primary language is not English, as indicated on a home language survey, and as a summative annual assessment (SAA) to students who have been identified previously as English learners.

State law (California Education Code [EC] sections 313 and 60810) and federal law (Title III of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act [ESEA]) require that schools administer a state test of English language proficiency to: (1) newly enrolled students whose primary language is not English as an IA, and (2) students who are English learners as a SAA.  For California’s public school students, this test is the ELPAC.  The ELPAC has three purposes:

  1. To identify students who are limited English proficient (LEP)
  2. To determine the level of English language proficiency of LEP students
  3. To assess the progress of LEP students in acquiring the skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing in English

At the time of initial enrollment, a home language survey is used to determine the student’s primary language. (5 CCR 11307) Within 30 calendar days of initial enrollment, each student whose home language is other than English, as determined by the home language survey, and for whom there is no record of results from an English language development test, shall be assessed for English-language proficiency using the state-designated instrument English Language Proficiency Assessment for California (ELPAC). (5 CCR 11511)

All students shall have sufficient time to complete the ELPAC as provided in the directions for test administration. (5 CCR 11516)

Students with a disability shall take the ELPAC with those accommodations for testing that the student has regularly used during instruction and classroom assessment as delineated in the student’s individualized instruction plan (IEP) or Section 504 plan that are appropriate and necessary to address the student’s individual needs. (5 CCR 11516.5) Students with the most significant cognitive disabilities, as determined by the student’s IEP team, will take the Alternate ELPAC for initial and summative purposes.

 Guidelines for Reclassification

The ELPAC assesses student performance in the following areas:  Listening, Speaking, Reading and Writing. In order to be reclassified as fluent English proficient, as indicated in the following chart, students must: (1) meet an ELPAC minimum score; (2) meet a minimum Lexile range; (3) receive a grade of a C or better in ELA or a teacher recommendation; and (4) obtain parent approval:

Green Dot shall provide notice to parents or guardians of their rights, invite them to participate in the process, and obtain their approval in writing, during a face-to-face meeting or in a phone call .

Monitoring

The school will monitor student performance for four years after reclassification in accordance with existing California regulations and Title III of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA).

Notifications

Families of students whose primary language is not English will receive the following notifications:

  1. Before students are enrolled in a program for English language learners, parents/guardians shall receive information about the program and their opportunities for parental involvement. This information shall include the fact that an individual student’s participation in the program is voluntary on the part of the parent/guardian. (Education Code 52173)
  2. Not later than 30 calendar days after the beginning of the school year, each parent/guardian of a student participating in, or identified for participation in, a language instruction program supported by federal
    Title III funds shall receive notification of the assessment of their child’s English proficiency. The notice shall include all of the following: (Education Code 440; 20 USC 6312)

    • The reason for the student’s classification as English language learner
    • The level of English proficiency
    • Reclassification criteria
    • Graduation rate (high school only)
    • A description of the program for English language development instruction, including a description of all of the following:
      • The manner in which the program will meet the educational strengths and needs of the student
      • The manner in which the program will help the student develop their English proficiency and meet age-appropriate academic standards
      • The specific exit requirements for the program, the expected rate of transition from the program into classrooms not tailored for English language learner students, and the expected rate of graduation from secondary school if Title I funds are used for students in secondary schools
      • Where the student has been identified for special education, the manner in which the program meets the requirements of the student’s IEP
  3. Information regarding a parent/guardian’s option to decline to allow the student to become enrolled in the program or to choose to allow the student to become enrolled in an alternative program.
  4. Information designed to assist a parent/guardian in selecting among available programs, if more than one program is offered.
  5. Parent/guardians also shall be notified of the results of any reassessments. (Education Code 3)
  6. Within 30 days of initial enrollment, parents of English Learners with an IEP, will be informed by the school how the current program will meet the objectives of the IEP.

Parental or Guardian Choice of Language Acquisition Program

  1. At the beginning of each school year, parents/guardians shall be informed of the placement of their children in a language acquisition program (Education Code 310; 5 CCR 11309)
  2. Parents or legal guardians of pupils enrolled in the school may choose a language acquisition program that best suits their child pursuant to this section. Schools in which the parents or legal guardians of 30 pupils or more per school or the parents or legal guardians of 20 pupils or more in any grade request a language acquisition program that is designed to provide language instruction shall be required to offer such a program to the extent possible, based upon the requirements of California Education Code Section 305. Parents of English language learners shall be notified of the program options available to their students and of their right to request a different program.

 

Rev. 06/2021

Instruction Policy  B. 13.0

Policy:  English Language Development (ELD) Program:  High School Placement Criteria

Structured English Immersion or English Language Mainstream courses are offered at each school for students who are less than reasonable proficient in English.

Students are placed based on the following placement criteria:

Note: Ideally, all students with fewer than 12 months in the country and less than reasonable fluency should be placed in a Newcomer Program.  Schools with too few students to offer a Newcomer ELD program may include ELs in the most appropriate Designated course and ensure that students receive supplemental instruction appropriate to their proficiency level with curriculum such as Imagine Learning.

Course Descriptions for R180, ELD and Academic English Essentials Courses

ELD 1 A – 8346

ELD 1 A is designed for recent arrivals to the United States who score 1 on the Reading and Writing portions of the ELPAC and who score below 100 on the Scholastic Reading Inventory.  Typical ELD 1A students have had little or no English instruction in their home countries and manifest widely varying levels of literacy in their home language. Hampton Brown materials (High School: Edge: Fundamentals, Middle School: Inside Level B and Inside the USA: Newcomers for Middle School) are used to teach Early Intermediate-level ELD standards.  The goal of the course, in combination with ELD 1B, is to raise students’ listening, speaking, reading and writing skills to the Early Intermediate level.  This double-blocked semester-long class replaces the grade level English Language Arts core class and one elective.  At the HS level, “double-blocked” is defined as one approximately 100-minute period each regular “Block Day” and two short periods on the “All-Period Day.”  For example, a student might take ELD 1 A as period 1 on Monday and Thursday, and as Period 4 on Tuesday and Friday, while attending both Period 1 and Period 4 on the “All period day.”

ELD 1 B – 8347

HS: Prerequisites: Passage of ELD 1A end-of-course exam with 75% or higher, or a score of 100-485 Lexile’s on the Edge Placement Test.

Designed as a follow-up to the ELD 1A class for students new to the country and who score a 1 on the ELPAC. Hampton Brown materials (High School: Edge Fundamentals, Middle School: Inside Level B and Inside the USA: Newcomers for Middle School) are used to teach Early Intermediate-level ELD standards.  The goal of the course, in combination with ELD 1A, is to lift students’ listening, speaking, reading and writing skills to Early Intermediate level.  This double-blocked semester-long class replaces ELA and an elective.

ELD 2 A – 8348

NOT UC APPROVED (g)

Prerequisites: Passage of ELD 1B end-of-course exam with 75% or higher or a score of 485-520 Lexile’s on the Edge Placement Test. ELPAC score is a level 2 or 3.

This course is designed as a follow up to the ELD 1B class for Newcomers.  Hampton Brown materials (High School: Edge: Level A, Middle School: Inside: Level C) are used to teach Early Intermediate-level ELD standards in all four domains of language.  The goal of the course, in combination with ELD 2B, is to raise students’ listening, speaking, reading and writing skills to Intermediate level.  This double-blocked semester-long class replaces the grade level ELA English Language Arts core class and one elective.  At the HS level, “double-blocked” is defined as one approximately 100-minute period each regular “Block Day” and two short periods on the “All-Period Day.”  For example, a student might take ELD 1 A as period 1 on Monday and Thursday, and as Period 4 on Tuesday and Friday, while attending both Period 1 and Period 4 on the “All period day.”

ELD 2 B – 8349

NOT UC APPROVED (g)

Prerequisites: Passage of ELD 2A end-of-course exam with 75% or better success, or a score of 520-735 Lexile’s on the Edge Placement Test. ELPAC  is level 2 or 3

Designed as a follow-on to the ELD 2A class Newcomers.  Hampton Brown materials (High School: Edge: Level A, Middle School: Inside: Level C) are used to teach Intermediate-level ELD standards in all four domains of language.  Goal of the course, in combination with ELD 2A, is to lift students’ listening, speaking, reading and writing skills to Intermediate level.  This double-blocked semester-long class replaces ELA and an elective.

 Academic English Essentials 10

AEE is designed as a yearlong intervention for 10th grade students who score in the 500-900 range of the SRI after finishing the 9th grade Read 180 class.  It may also be used as a support class for English learners needing additional literacy support.  In 2012-13, AEE 10 will address reading and writing strategies necessary to pass the CAHSEE with proficiency and will also be aligned to the CA Common Core standards.  Reading instruction will focus on annotation and note taking strategies.  Writing instruction will include the CAHSEE essay formats as well as the argument based, on-demand “college ready” writing as defined by the Early Assessment Program.  Listening and Speaking instruction will include Kate Kinsella strategies for teaching academic discourse and building academic vocabulary.  Each unit will incorporate the four Common Core strands:  Reading, Writing, Listening and Speaking, and Language (which includes Vocabulary and Written Conventions).   Quarterly summative assessments will include one multiple choice reading comprehension exam, one process writing assignment, and one on-demand timed writing assignment.

READ 180

This program published by Scholastic is a reading intervention program for high school students reading below grade level.  All students at Green Dot are tested using the Scholastic Reading Inventory assessment upon entering school.   Students take a Read 180 class in which they are engaged in a 3-part program that includes independent reading, teacher-led mini lessons on reading strategies, and online computer adaptive software that supports targets students reading needs based on lexile levels .

 

Rev. 06/2020

Policy:  Mathematics Placement Policy

This policy has been adopted to establish a fair, objective, and transparent protocol for placement in mathematics courses for students entering 9th grade, in order to ensure the success of every student and to meet the Legislative intent of the California Mathematics Placement Act of 2015.

  1. In determining the mathematics course placement for entering 9th grade students, Green Dot systematically takes multiple objective academic measures of student performance into consideration, which may include any or all of the following as determined by Green Dot:
    • i-Ready Diagnostic Adaptive Assessment aligned to the Common Core Math standards;
    • Statewide summative mathematics assessments through the CAASPP;
    • Placement tests that are aligned to state-adopted content standards in mathematics;
    • Recommendation, if available, of each student’s 8th grade mathematics teacher based on classroom assignment and grades;
    • Recommendation, if any, of each student’s 9th grade mathematics teacher based on classroom assignments and grades provided at the beginning of the school year;
    • Final grade in mathematics on the student’s official, end of the year 8th grade report card; or
    • Results from all placement checkpoints, including at least one (1) placement checkpoint within the first month of the school year as described in Section 2, below.
  2. Green Dot will provide at least one (1) placement checkpoint within the first month of the school year to ensure accurate placement and permit reevaluation of individual student progress. All mathematics teachers responsible for teaching 9th grade students will assess the mathematics placements for each 9th grade student assigned to the teacher’s mathematics class. The teacher’s assessment will take into consideration factors which may include, but are not limited to, updated i-Ready Adaptive Diagnostic scores, the student’s classroom assignments, quizzes, tests, exams, and grades, and any comments provided by the student, the student’s parent/legal guardian, and/or the student’s other teachers regarding the student’s mathematics placement. Based on the assessment, the teacher will then recommend that the student remain in the current mathematics placement or be transferred to another mathematics placement, in which case the teacher shall specify the mathematics course or level recommended for the student.
  3. The Green Dot Director, or his or her designee, shall examine aggregate student placement data annually to ensure that students who are qualified to progress in mathematics courses based on their performance on objective academic measures included in Section 1 of this policy are not held back in a disproportionate manner on the basis of their race, ethnicity, gender, or socioeconomic background. Green Dot shall annually report the aggregate results of this examination to the School Board.
  4. Green Dot offers clear and timely recourse for each student and his or her parent or legal guardian who questions the student’s placement, as follows:
    • A parent/legal guardian of any 9th grade student may submit a written request to the Green Dot Principal, or his or her designee, that:
      • Requests information regarding how the student’s mathematics placement was determined. Within five (5) days of receipt, the Green Dot Principal or designee shall respond in writing to the parent/legal guardian’s request by providing the information, including the objective academic measures that Green Dot relied upon in determining the student’s mathematics placement.
      • Requests that the student retake the i-Ready Diagnostic and/or an additional placement test, in which case the Principal or designee will attempt to facilitate the retest within two (2) weeks.
      • Requests reconsideration of the student’s mathematics placement based on objective academic measures. Within five (5) school days of receipt, the Green Dot Principal or designee shall respond in writing to the parent/legal guardian’s request. The Principal or designee and the student’s mathematics teacher must assess the objective academic measures provided by the parent in conjunction with the objective academic measures identified in Section 1 and 2 of this policy. Based on this assessment, the Principal or designee must determine whether the most appropriate mathematics placement for the student is the student’s current placement or another placement, in which case the Principal shall specify the mathematics course or level recommended for the student. The Principal’s or designee’s response must provide the determination as well as the objective academic measures that the Principal or designee relied upon in making that determination.
    • Notwithstanding the foregoing, if the Principal or designee requires additional time to respond to a parent/legal guardian’s request, the Principal or designee will provide a written response indicating that additional time is needed. In no event shall the Principal’s or designee’s response time exceed one (1) month.
    • If, after reconsideration of the student’s mathematics placement by the Principal or designee, the parent/legal guardian is dissatisfied with the student’s mathematics placement, the parent/legal guardian may choose to sign a voluntary waiver requesting that the student be placed in another mathematics course against the professional recommendation of the Principal or designee, acknowledging and accepting responsibility for this placement.
  5. Green Dot shall ensure that this mathematics placement policy is posted on its website.
  6. This policy is adopted pursuant to the Mathematics Placement Act of 2015, enacted as Education Code Section 51224.7.

 

Rev. 06/2021

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